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Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 Winners Announced

Each year, nature photographers and enthusiasts alike are brought out of their hides to awe at the amazing winners of Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition. 2019’s winning images have just been announced, and are a testament to the long-standing competition.

This year saw 48,000 entries from 100 different countries, with 19 different categories and two overall winners (adult and young). This year’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year went to Yongqing Bao of Qinghai, China, for his dramatic action shot framing a showdown between a Tibetan fox and a marmot. Encapsulating a tragicomedy effect as the marmot faces potential death, Bao’s capture is a powerful reflection on the stark duality of life.

Yongqing Bao / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

“Photographically, it is quite simply the perfect moment. The expressive intensity of the postures holds you transfixed, and the thread of energy between the raised paws seems to hold the protagonists in perfect balance,” said judge Roz Kidman Cox. “Images from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau are rare enough, but to have captured such a powerful interaction between a Tibetan fox and a marmot – two species key to the ecology of this high-grassland region – is extraordinary.”

Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year was claimed by fourteen-year-old Cruz Erdmann, with his ethereal portrait of a bigfin reef squid. Glimmering iridescent in a pool of inky-black water, the squid appears as if lost in a dream. Photographed on a night dive in the Lembeth Strait off North Sulawesi, Indonesia, Cruz used his father’s old underwater camera to snap the squid.

Cruz Erdmann / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

“To dive in the pitch dark, find this beautiful squid and to be able to photograph it so elegantly, to reveal its wonderful shapes and colours, takes so much skill. What a resounding achievement for such a young photographer,” said judge Theo Bosboom.

The winning images and a selection of other finalists will be exhibited at the Natural History Museum on 18th October 2019, before touring across the UK and then to international locations such as Canada, Span, the USA, and more. To book tickets, please visit the competition’s website.

Entries for the 2020 competition open on Monday 21st October and close at 11:30am on 12th December 2019. The competition is open to all ages and abilities.

The category winners are as follows:

Animals in Their Environment

Shangzhen Fan / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Animal Portraits

Ripan Biswas / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Behaviour: Amphibians and Reptiles

Manuel Plaickner / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Behaviour: Birds

Audun Rikardsen / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Behaviour: Invertebrates

Daniel Kronauer / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Behaviour: Mammals (Joint Winner)

Ingo Arndt / Wildlife Photographer of the Year
Yongqing Bao / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Plants and Fungi

Zorica Kovacevic / / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Under Water

David Doubilet / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Urban Wildlife

Charlie Hamilton James / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Earth’s Environments

Luis Vilariño Lopez / / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Black and White

Max Waugh / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Wildlife Photojournalism: Single Image

Alejandro Prieto / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Wildlife Photojournalist Story Award

Jasper Doest / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Rising Star Portfolio Award

Jérémie Villet / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Wildlife Photographer of the Year Portfolio Award

Steffan Christmann / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

15-17 Years Old

Riccardo Marchgiani / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

10 Years and Under

Thomas Easterbrook / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

For more, check out the WPOTY Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and follow the hashtag #WPY55.

Ed Carr is a Yorkshire-born landscape photographer and nature writer. Having spent his youth in the North Yorkshire Moors National Park, he takes any opportunity to don his hiking boots and head out, camera in hand. When not out taking pictures or hastily scribbling down his thoughts, Ed’s halfway up a hill out chasing after his dog, Hendrix.

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